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from connecticut gave a detailed account of the sandy hook shooting last month. also testifying, philadelphia mayor michael nutter, the mother of the victim of the arizonan shooting two years ago and police chief from minnesota. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you very much for joining us on this very solemn and important occasion for the american people. just over a month ago our nation was shocked and horrified by the news of the shooting at sandy hook elementary school in newtown connecticut. 20 children and six educators were taken from us at gunpoint. an act of senseless incomprehensible violence struck at the heart of our families and schools and communities across the country. earlier this month, shortly after newtown, all members of congress to get both to protect and defend the constitution and the american people. to protect and defend, that is our first responsibility to read today leaders of the house democratic caucus have come together to fulfill that duty to confront the challenge of some violence in our society to enact and insure the safety and security of ou
sandy relief efforts. we'll have live coverage of the senate when they return at 2:15 eastern here on c-span2. going to take you live next acrosstown in washington to the democratic national committee and their winter meeting about to get underway. they're going to hear from democratic national committee chairman, debbie debbie wasserman schultz. it should get underway shortly here on c-span2. democratic national committee chairman debbie wasserman schultz will speak shortly talking about the democratic party's agenda and challenges ahead for the 113th congress. we'll have live coverage when she gets underway on c-span2. a look at the agenda ahead in transportics with secretary ray a are hood who called on congress to pass a five-year long-term transportation bill. [applause] >> hello, everybody. thank you very much. good noontime to all of you and thank you for including me again in your program. i want to ask all of our dot team gathered for lunch to stand up and be recognized. all dot stand up and be recognized. [applause] thank you all. thank you. i know that trb wouldn't be what it
change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. but we also bear witness to rapid breakthroughs in technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the tragedies that we have had to endure. we truly live in extraordinary times. we also live in an extraordinary state, filled with extraordinary people. where the world sees uncertainty, we washingtonians see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildren. we have a spirit of innovation here in washington that has changed the world, from aerospace to software to e-commerce. and you know what? we are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things. first, with our uniquely powerful fusion of values and talents, washington state has the potential to lead the next wave of world-changing innovations. second, the world will not wait for us.
happened in the tragedy at the sandy hook elementary school. all humanity was moved by that. why weren't white people moved by those children being murdered? >> guest: why aren't white people is concerned about the death of a black child as they are about the death of a white child's? that is one of the fundamental issues that we still address. you know, we have had situations where assault weapons are used on a weekly basis, monthly basis in the urban areas and the victims are black children. >> host: dr. carson, 500 people in 2012 or murdered, black people were murdered on the south side of chicago and it seems to matter more that they are killing each other than there are children who are dead. it doesn't seem to be -- in the country even in our community about it. >> guest: that is where we are so nation. i think most americans, blacks and whites and all races understand that we are not the nation -- >> host: that we say we are. >> guest: but there is still a reluctance to address that issue and understand it. part of it comes from -- if you put say one of the problems of school ed
see what happened in that tragedy at the sandy hook elementary school why were people moved by those children being hurt? >> guest: why aren't white people as concerned about the death of a black child as we are about the death of a black child? that is one of the fundamental issues that we still address. we have had situations where assault weapons are used on a weekly basis, a monthly basis and their urban areas and the victims are black children. >> host: 2,000 children, black children were murdered on the south side of chicago and a seems to have mattered more that they were killing each other than that they were children who were dead, and it doesn't seem to be the uproar in the country. in our community -- >> guest: but that's where we are as the nation. i think most americans, black and white, all races understand that we are not the equal nation that -- >> host: that we say we are. >> guest: that there is still a reluctance to address that issue and understand that part of it comes from the problem of school education as if white children are in inferior schools there is acti
murdered, yet we all see what happened in that tragedy at the sandy hook elementary school why were people moved by those children being murdered? >> guest: people are as concerned about the death of a black child and as they are about the death of a black child that is one of the fundamental issues that we still address. we have had situations where assault weapons are used on a weekly basis in their urban areas and the victims are children. >> host: 500 people in 2012 for murder, black people were murdered on the south side of chicago and seems to matter more that they are killing each other in their children are dead and it doesn't seem to be the uproar in the country even in our community about it. >> guest: but that's where we are as a nation. most americans black-and-white and of all races understand the we are not the equal nation that we say we are. but there's still a reluctance to address that issue and understand that part of it comes from if you put one of the laws of school education is that white children are an inferior schools. >> host: there's action. >> guest: there's act
we begin this discussioncomes out to you on personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, as in denver colorado on personal business and i was driving to the denver suburbs and i passed into oruro, colorado and saw the sign that to myself, as journalists often do, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago and a young man now appears to be utterly deranged, went to the theater and began shooting people with an assault weapon. and it went away. it is not part of a presidential debate, not part of the daily journalistic diet. so that wednesday night, i e-mailed the reduced their of the "meet the press" show coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that needs to be thinking about. and i said you should put shooting at the top of the list. we've been through oruro, the sikh temple, the shopping mall. think about this. this is before we got to sandy hook in it. we had a time of absolute carnage in america to see nothing going on in chicago in most urban areas around america. a hundred six homicides in
to come in and settle themselves down. super storm sandy, drought on agriculture, wildfires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 20 # 11, we had more disasters in the united states costing more than a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had more expensive disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely with many, many greater costs. we ray -- we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of all stripes with practitioners, with policymakers from the international to the local level with conservation organizations, with cooperations, and it is our belief that only, and i want to emphasize "only" by working together can we solve these challenges that face us. the costs are the just not financial, but as we tragically know, many, many lives are lost in these disasters so if we can come up with just one
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8